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Tips for professionals

A little support makes a big difference

About

Environment

Make the environment comfortable for me 

The physical environments of hospitals and other care settings can be highly distracting and confusing to people living with dementia and can cause them distress.

 


Independence

Support my independence

Most people living with dementia will benefit from being given space to do things by themselves and to spend time with their visitors alone. By understanding the individual’s strengths and abilities, you will be able to offer support when required.


Finding the Why; Enabling Active Participation in Life in Aged Care
Finding the Why was filmed at Uniting Starrett Lodge, NSW, Australia. The film presents a fresh perspective on aged care looking specifically at Starrett Lodge's unique approach to enabling active participation in life in aged care. It captures the essence of giving real meaning and purpose to life for those living with dementia.

Connection

                            Listen to and connect with me 

It can often be difficult for people living with dementia to communicate in hospital or care settings, especially when healthcare professionals lack a proper understanding of dementia and the listening skills required. If a person with dementia feels like they are not being properly listened to, this can cause them distress and may result in their care not meeting their specific needs.


Communication

                            Communicate clearly with me 

It’s important for healthcare professionals to remember that people living with dementia have unique requirements when it comes to communication. Dementia makes it harder for people to concentrate and they may be unable to hold multiple ideas in their minds during conversation. Unfortunately, the distractions and stresses that often occur with hospital admissions or group care settings can make communication more difficult.


Dementia - The "Communication Disease" - by Professor Alison Wray - Narrated by Tony Robinson

Orientation

                            Help me orientate myself 

A few simple reminders can be an effective way of keeping people living with dementia oriented

 

 



Centre for Cultural Diversity in Ageing
Visual picture based printable communication cards available in 37 languages. The Communication Cards depict a wide range of daily activities and situations and can be used to prompt discussion, assist with directions and clarify a person’s needs.
 Download the cards

Staff development

                            Ensure your staff have the skills and knowledge to support me 

To make sure you and your team are best equipped to care for people living with dementia, it’s important you commit to education and training.

 


Barbara, the whole story
Created by nurses at Guy's and St Thomas' to raise awareness of dementia among hospital staff, Barbara's Story has changed attitudes to dementia in hospitals across the world.

Engagement

Keep me engaged

To enable people living with dementia to live as full and active lives as possible, it’s important they stay socially, physically, and mentally engaged.